How Much Does It Cost To Install A Hitch?

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How Much Does It Cost To Install A Hitch?

Most professionals will charge an average of about $225 up to $625 or more to install a hitch professionally. This differs based on the type of vehicle and the type of hitch. A trailer hitch will allow a truck, vehicle, and van to be able to carry or tow a trailer, a 5th wheel RV, and many other huge vehicles.

If there is no hitch on your current truck, SUV, or vehicle, many cars and trucks can always have one fixed as an accessorial part.

The cost of setting up a hitch will base on the kind of hitch, the model and make of the vehicle, as well as the company performing the task. As regards the question, what is the cost to install a hitch? What are the things involved in installing a hitch? We will talk more about these. Let’s get it started!

What is the Cost of a Trailer Hitch Installation?

It ranges from $250 to hundreds of dollars. However, the cost is not a size-fit-all. The cost of setting up a trailer hitch always varies, with the kind of hitch, the kind of vehicle, and the labor rate of the service that is carrying out the task for you; all having a great impact on the cost of the installation. Let’s dig into some detail concerning what is involved setting up a trailer hitch.

What are the Various Parts of a Trailer Hitch?

To further understand how the pricing of a trailer hitch setup is calculated, it is important to first understand all the various parts of a traditional, ball-style, rear-mounted trailer hitch. So, what are the various parts of a regular ball-style trailer hitch, and what is their cost?

  • Receiver: The receiver is the component of the trailer hitch that bolts to the vehicle’s frame. It is one of the most essential parts of a trailer hitch because it is the only structural link between your vehicle and the thing you are towing. Receivers usually cost about $100 to $250, based on the brand and the class of hitch. The class of hitch means its level of heavy-duty, with various types being considered to tow various amounts.
  • Ball mount: This is the next critical part of a trailer hitch. The ball mount is the component that slides into the receiver and thus joins the ball to the vehicle. Ball mounts in various styles for different use, though the majority of them only come with a piece that will slide into the receiver and a small platform on which the actual ball will be mounted. Also, almost all ball mounts will come with a hole in the part that enters into the receiver to allow a hitch pin, and you may be able to adjust some. Ball mounts typical cost is between $10 and $50, based on the style and quality of the ball mount.
  • Hitch pin: This is the next part of the trailer hitch and they are just “L” shaped metal components that contain small clip holes end and are placed inside a hole on the receiver’s side to pass through the ball mount and escape on the other end. This is helpful to lock the ball mount into the receiver and make sure that no item will shift around when you want it fixed. Hitch pins are less expensive and often cost less than $20 because of their uttermost simplicity.
  • Trailer ball: this is, just as the name implies, a ball that works as the major point of a physical link between your vehicle and the item you are towing. The ball is a simple component and features the exact metal ball and a threaded metal rod that enables it to be connected to the ball amount. Trailer balls often cost about $5 and $40, based on the size. The most popular ball sizes include 1-7/8”, 3”, 3, and 2-5/16”. Larger balls are considered to tow more pounds.
  • Safety chains: This is a critical part of a safe towing installation. These are only metal chains; however, they play a major role in ensuring that your towing installation is safe and secure. The safety chains are connected to the vehicle itself and the trailer, and work as a backup in case the ball connection fails. The use of two chains should be considered all the time, and are to be operated in an “X” shape under the ball connection. Safety chains are also less expensive and often cost below $20, making them great for an additional level of security.
  • Wiring Harness: This trailer wiring harness is the last piece of the puzzle. It is a collection of wires that attach to the vehicle and the trailer. A trailer harness is used to create a connection between the brake lights as well as convert signals of the tow vehicles to the brake lights and convert signals of the trailer so that when the lights of the vehicle are activated, the trailers are also activated. Wiring harnesses often cost about $10 to $50.
  • Labor cost: If you will not install your trailer hitch yourself, you will need to hire a professional installer to perform it for you, which implies that you will pay for their labor rate. This will, surely, be different from one mechanic to another, with a much wider range cited by AAA. They report that some labor rates are as cheaper as $47 per hour, while others charge up to $215 per hour.

The Average Cost of Hitch Installation

Many experts will usually charge around $250 up to $750 or more to professionally install the hitch. Looking past the parts, most experts will charge around $100 – $400 to install a hitch, highly based on the make and model of your vehicle. When performed at a vehicle dealership, it can be much costly, normally up to $1,300.

Two members on Odyclub.com reported that they received quotes for $1,100 and $1,600. It is one of the highly useful parts of a trailer hitch, U-Haul as an example can set up trailer hitches on any make and model of the vehicle. They will list the parts, circuitry, as well as a service warranty in the overall bill.

The costs will greatly differ based on the make and type of the vehicle, however, our findings, sh that it is possible to install a hitch on most cars and trucks for around $200 to $350. For example, expect to pay $230 for a 2009 Toyota Corolla to have a hitch completely installed, however others, as shown in the table below, might be more expensive. 

We spent more time checking online platforms for exact owners who have set up trailer hitches in their vehicle to have a real owner feel and account, Here are some of their installation experiences:

The Average Cost of Hitch Installation

Makes/Models

2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee

Ford Explorer

Honda CR-V

Toyota Rav4

Subaru Ascent

Chevrolet Colorado

Mazda CX-5

Subaru Forester

Honda Odyssey

Makes/Models

$365

$350

Parts: $300 for and Labor rate: $600

$186

$444 (from the dealership)

$450 (parts: $200 for and labor rate: $250

$440

$450

$1000

FAQ About a Hitch Installation

What is the duration of installing a hitch?

A professional installer might charge one hour of labor regardless of the installation time of the hitch which is 15 minutes. You could make calls around to different auto repair shops to figure out their labor rate but my estimation was an average of $90 to $120 per hour.

Can you perform a hitch installation yourself?

Yes, you can set up a trailer hitch by yourself as long as all the tools needed for the job are available. DIY hitch setup is a perfect way to save cost on setting up the trailer hitch cost. CURT personalized hitches are designed to make setting up as convenient and as less invasive as possible.

What is the cost to set up a hitch on an SUV?

The cost of standard hitches can start from $150 – $800. The average cost of Gooseneck hitches is around $400 – $800, and you can prepare to spend around $500 – $2,500 for fifth-wheel hitches. If you tow items with your car or truck, there are important factors to note. Consider the things you will use for it.

Final Thoughts

As you now know, the cost to set up a trailer hitch differs a lot based on the type of vehicle and where the hitch will be mounted. This is why it is so critical to check all your options, including obtaining quotes from the best hitch installers to ensure that you don’t pay more than you should for setting up your trailer hitch.

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Thomas Curry
Thomas Curry
Thomas has a degree in literature from Stanford University and a profession in Mass Communication. Thomas is a member of the Moving Feedback research team, an expert in writing educative articles to help readers make the right buying decisions. He is well versed in moving industry matters to give the best advice on moving needs.
Thomas Curry - Moving Feedback Research Team
Thomas Curry - Moving Feedback Research Team

Thomas has a degree in literature from Stanford University and a profession in Mass Communication. Thomas is a member of the Moving Feedback research team, an expert in writing educative articles to help readers make the right buying decisions. He is well versed in moving industry matters to give the best advice on moving needs.

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