Where People Moved for Lower Cost of Living

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Where People Moved for Lower Cost of Living - Moving Feedback (1)

It’s an idea that appeals to us all. We think ‘I could live in a mansion for what I am paying here if I lived in…’ Space to spread out is on the list to improve our lives, but there’s more to the equation.

At different times in our lives, we need different things from the place where we live.

Early on, we might be looking for cafe society where we can eat, drink and be merry. Often there’s a time when we are looking for childcare and good schools. Then there might be the great days when there’s a little more disposable income, meaning you might be looking for things to do with off-work hours. Hopefully, it’s a long time coming, but there may be a time when support services and care matters most.

Here’s a look at some places in the US where the cost of living is lower:

1. Lansing, Michigan

Who is it for?

As a college town and the state capital, Lansing MI is home to students, academics, state government workers as well as those involved in the auto industry. The town has great nightlife and provides a host of outdoor living activities. The Wharton Center even has the latest Broadway shows. The vibe is upbeat and young.

Who isn’t it for?

Climate and the crime figures might put off people looking for a little warmth and ease in their lives. Although family-friendly, the public school system leaves a little to be desired competitively.

The Numbers

  • Average house prices $75,000 (National average $187,700)
  • Average rental costs $763 (National average $949)
  • Average Household Income: $36,851 (National $55,322)

Find out more on Lansing on the city’s website or read why US News & World Report ranks Lansing in the top half of their Best Places to Live list.

2. Springfield, Illinois

Who is it for?

As the capital and the heart of the Land of Lincoln, Springfield attracts those involved in state government and those who appreciate a mid-size city with a small-town feel. The schools are high-quality and it has great public transportation. It makes the town great for families.

Who isn’t it for?

Same as Lansing, the climate will scare off some, and those who are looking for an art gallery on every corner will feel a lack.

The Numbers

  • Average house prices $123,000 (National average $187,700)
  • Average rental costs $742 (National average $949)
  • Average Household Income: $50,191 (National $55,322)

Find out more about Springfield on the city’s visitor site, or click here to read up on some highlights of the town.

3. Topeka, Kansas

Who is it for?

Topeka, KS has made efforts to accommodate everyone. Its downtown NOTO district incorporates cafe society and the arts. There are high-quality schooling and access to bigger cities for those who need it.

Who isn’t it for?

It might be too far away for some.

The Numbers

  • Average house prices $99, 400 (National average $187,700)
  • Average rental costs $724 (National average $949)
  • Average Household Income:$43, 740 (National $55,322)

Find out more about Topeka on the city’s website, or check out what other people have to say about it here.

4. Palm Bay, Florida

Who is it for?

Palm Bay is something of a renaissance town. In the past, it has been for middle-income families, so for those looking to get into Florida but without the millions that Miami needs, this might be the place to start.

Who isn’t it for?

People who need to be in the heart of things might find Palm Bay a little sleepy. The words ‘Bedroom town’ often appears in the reviews. But it is only an hour away from Orlando.

The Numbers

  • Average house prices $110, 000 (National average $187,700)
  • Average rental costs $949 (National average $949)
  • Average Household Income: $43, 793 (National $55,322)

Find out more on Palm Bay’s website or read this Forbes article.

5. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Who is it for?

Philadelphia is a small big city which has been coming back to life over the last decades. A vibrant university town with close connections to New York and Washington D.C., it has all the advantages of a school system, transport system, culture etc., but it has a small city feel.

Who isn’t it for?

If you’re looking for Florida style retirement – Philadelphia is not the place for you.

The Numbers

  • Average house prices $147, 300 (National average $187,700)
  • Average rental costs $943 (National average $949)
  • Average Household Income: $39, 770 (National $55,322)

For more on Philadelphia go to the visitors’ site or check this list of things to know.

The following table displays the Top 5 Places in the US where the cost of living is lower:

No.Top 5 Places in the US where the cost of living is lower
1.Lansing, Michigan
2.Springfield, Illinois
3.Topeka, Kansas
4.Palm Bay, Florida
5.Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

It’s Not Just the Numbers Though

Don’t forget though, there’s more to living than the numbers. Moving to another town can mean leaving behind friends and family. It takes time to create a new support system around you. Is that something that you feel able to do?

Will the place you’re going have what you need? If you love to go to the opera or symphony are they available? Can you drive? If you don’t, you have to be sure of a good public transport system. Will there be employment in your line of work?

Top Six Things to Remember

If you’re looking to save on costs, these will add to your monthly bills. Make sure you check:

  1. Heating and Cooling costs – will winter heating bills or summer cooling make a lower cost house suddenly much more expensive.
  2. Property taxes – make sure that property taxes are going to be in the range you can afford.
  3. Home maintenance – make sure the costs of maintaining your property will be within your budget. Houses with pools need maintenance, lawns must be mowed.
  4. Climate costs – clearing snow, or cleaning up after a hurricane can be expensive. In some places, these are not extraordinary but something that happens every year.
  5. Transport costs – if you move out of the city, will you add to your travel bills. A monthly train pass or the extra gas will add up.
  6. Insurance – don’t forget to add in extra insurance costs.
Thomas Campbell
Thomas Campbell
He has a degree in literature from Stanford University and a profession in Mass Communication. Thomas is a member of the Moving Feedback research team, an expert in writing educative articles to help readers make the right buying decisions. He is well versed in moving industry matters to give the best advice on moving needs.
Thomas Campbell
Thomas Campbell
He has a degree in literature from Stanford University and a profession in Mass Communication. Thomas is a member of the Moving Feedback research team, an expert in writing educative articles to help readers make the right buying decisions. He is well versed in moving industry matters to give the best advice on moving needs.

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